Happy Birthday, Little Pony

April 17, 1964. For most of us, that date probably means nothing. But, for lovers of the iconic Ford Mustang, it’s one that’s etched forever in their collective memories. Fifty years ago this Thursday, the automobile that started the so-called “pony car” craze arrived in showrooms across North America and, as the cliché goes, the rest is history.

CAA Magazine features the latest version of the Mustang on its current Spring 2014 cover with an in-depth story on this remarkable car’s popularity. They’re not the only lovers. Articles in numerous publications have appeared over the last month as admirers worldwide celebrate the history of this legendary vehicle.

In its first year, Ford had hoped to sell 100,000 Mustangs. During its launch week, CAA says four million people visited Ford showrooms and 22,000 placed their orders.

One year later, over 400,000 had been shipped and that number would swell to a million within 18 months of its introduction. To put that in context, CAA quotes Time Magazine, which said later, “By Detroit’s favourite yardstick – sales – the Ford Mustang is the most successful car ever introduced.”

When it was unveiled at the New York World’s Fair in 1964, advertisements heralded, “Unexpected look – unexpected choice – unexpected low price.” That price was just $2,985, a bargain even in 1964 terms.

Compared to similarly priced vehicles, the Mustang, with its European sports car-style long hood and short back end, was a beauty. CAA quotes former Autoweek magazine editor John Clor: “Economy cars of the day had nothing on them – rubber floor mats, Spartan interiors, dog-dish hubcaps,” he says. “The Mustang touched all the right buttons. Inside it was refined, and outside it looked special.”

Although the car is about as American as apple pie, CAA reports that it also has a unique Canadian connection, with the first two Mustangs ending up in our showrooms. Airline pilot Stanley Tucker of St. John’s, Newfoundland bought the very first unit.

The second Mustang that was shipped, a base six-cylinder model with just 110-horsepower, ended up going to Whitehorse. Ironically, despite the wild popularity of the car across North America, that unit sat unsold in the dealer’s showroom for a year before it was let go on a trade for a ’57 Plymouth. Apparently, Yukoners missed the memo on the pony car craze.

And a craze it was. The car appeared in the James Bond film Goldfinger in its first year and, along with numerous other movie, television and videogame appearances, will probably be best remembered in Steve McQueen’s Bullitt, which CAA says, “was, is and will always be the coolest Mustang ever.”

Like all great things, however, the car also had its ups and downs. It became big and bloated – and sales started to dip. Eventually, it was redesigned and reintroduced as the Mustang II in 1974, with mixed reviews.

Five years later, a European-styled model based on what was called the “Fox platform” was introduced, one that managed to hang on for 15 years.

In 1994, a fourth-generation model hit the streets sharing a design that attempted to recreate the vehicle’s pony car roots. Eleven years later, CAA says, it “went even further in that direction, embodying flamboyantly retro styling inside and out.”

Which brings us to the 2015 model, scheduled to arrive later this year as a perfect 50th birthday present for Mustang lovers everywhere. And I do mean everywhere, as it will be sold in parts of Asia and Europe for the first time, spreading the worldwide phenomenon even further.

CAA swoons: “The newest iteration of the pony car has a lower profile than its predecessor but still maintains an athletic stance. A shorter roof height and sculpted hood and door panels (for greater aerodynamics) add up to an overall taut sleeker design.” Three engine choices will be available, including a mind-blowing 5.0-litre V8 cranking out 420 horsepower.

In many ways, this iconic car has now come full circle, returning to its roots while looking forward to the future. “We crafted this car with the goal of creating a contemporary interpretation of Mustang – an American automotive icon that symbolizes optimism and freedom for millions of people around the world,” says Jim Farley, a Ford executive vice president.

Most certainly, there is some irony in those remarks. When it was introduced 50 years ago, the Ford Mustang was seen as a revolutionary sports car that would shake the rust off the boring, bland 1950’s and herald in a new generation. And it did. The 1960’s changed the world like no other decade in recent memory, setting us on a turbulent, uncharted course that has yet to be fully resolved.

For all of Ford’s hopefulness, when you look in the rearview mirror of a new Mustang, 1964 appears completely askew and further away than ever before. In rekindling memories of “optimism and freedom,” we’re conveniently forgetting about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy less than six months before the Mustang’s introduction, the escalation of the Vietnam War, race riots, and a rainbow of other world-changing events.

You can probably pick any point in history and fantasize about how it was a “better time.” In reality, the so-called “good old days,” were rarely particularly good and usually carried with them their own chorus of challenges and worries.

On this, the occasion of the Mustang’s 50th anniversary, perhaps our best bet is to use the nostalgia it creates to rekindle our own excitement about what’s important in our lives.

For auto lovers and the more than nine million people who’ve bought one, the original pony car may be just the ticket to help reignite their fire. “Ford Mustang inspires passion like no other car,” says Raj Nair, a Ford group vice president. “The visceral look, sound and performance of Mustang resonates with people, even if they’ve never driven one. Mustang is definitely more than just a car – it is the heart and soul of Ford.”

What fuels your heart and soul? What does it take to re-fire your passion? And how will you celebrate that re-ignition? Ladies and gentlemen, start your engines.

 

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